Pathways
Pre-Formal Pathway

Intent:

The pre-formal pathway is designed for learners with profound and complex needs who are at the very earliest stages of development. The curriculum is broken down into very small steps in order to provide as much opportunity as possible for them to make progress. The pre-formal pathway focuses on the early communication, cognitive, social and emotional skills that are the foundation of learning. It is a curriculum that recognises the importance of therapeutic work, movement and play in a child’s development and the need for sensory and multi-sensory approaches to learning.

Implementation:

The main route to learning for both pre-formal and informal curriculum pathways is through personalised targets with one-to-one teaching and support. Both pre-formal and informal curriculum pathways ensure learning is holistic with all parts of the curriculum interconnected. It builds in sufficient time for learners to repeat, practise and consolidate skills, recognising the learners’ need for consistency. It develops learners’ levels of engagement by finding out what interests and motivates them. Recognises each learner’s need for different levels of sensory stimulation or sensory integration. We recognise learners will need to be taught to transfer or generalise skills.
Learners on these pathways communicate in different ways and often their actions and sounds need to be interpreted by adults in order to develop a more structured form of communication that can be more widely understood. A consistent ‘Total Communication’ approach is essential so that each learner has the opportunity to process and respond. A range of alternative and augmented communication aids are used to allow pupils to communicate choices and to control the world around them. Some of our learners will use body movement, facial expression and vocalisation to communicate and respond. Others will be able to respond through gesture, signing, eye-pointing and simple spoken language. Objects of reference, symbols and on body signing are methods that can be used to develop awareness, anticipation, choice making and understanding. These early learning skills cannot be easily assigned to discrete curriculum areas as many of the skills overlap. The curriculum is personalised for each student based on assessments of individual needs and focus on the following curriculum areas:
· Communication and interaction
· Cognition and learning
· Physical and sensory
· Personal Care and Independence
Individual skills identified in these curriculum pathways are developed continuously, that is during regular individual sessions and generalised in group sessions. Many activities within these pathways provide a breadth of experiences for learners to develop their individual skills. Repetition is key for these learners so they can practise the same skill in a range of contexts and learning environments. Opportunities to experience subject learning such as humanities, science and P.S.H.C.E. are provided through topics of experience with a cross-curricular content.

Impact: Learners that follow pre-formal and informal pathways will have the opportunity to achieve accreditation at the end of Key Stage 5 through NOCN Personal Progress or Independent Living Skills. Leaners’ skills, knowledge, experiences and understanding are recorded in relation to their level of engagement. For many of our learners on these pathways their destinations will involve moving into a social care setting or attending a specialist post 19 college. For some, supported living may be appropriate with support to access the community. Our role, as educators for these learners is to ensure they have the skills needed to communicate and express their needs and wants to their support workers. This is a fundamental part of their curriculum experience whilst at Regency to enable learners to have the best opportunity to play a full part in the community as they mature into adulthood and leave Regency.

Informal Pathway

Intent:

The informal pathway meets the needs of our learners who have significant sensory and communication needs and who require an ongoing sensory-based pedagogical approach. They have significant and specific needs in the areas of sensory development, communication and interaction with a potential diagnosis of sensory processing disorder and Autistic Spectrum Disorder. The curriculum includes regular and repeated opportunities for structured activities with pupils working individually (1:1 with staff) and in small groups to develop social communication and interaction. The environment is designed to be low stimulus with the ability to change lighting, resources and activities to suit the individual and group needs. Informal learners communicate with the support of VOCA, AAC, signing, eye-pointing, symbols, pictures, objects and PECS.

Implementation:

The main route to learning for both pre-formal and informal curriculum pathways is through personalised targets with one-to-one teaching and support. Both pre-formal and informal curriculum pathways ensure learning is holistic with all parts of the curriculum interconnected. It builds in sufficient time for learners to repeat, practise and consolidate skills, recognising the learners’ need for consistency. It develops learners’ levels of engagement by finding out what interests and motivates them. Recognises each learner’s need for different levels of sensory stimulation or sensory integration. We recognise learners will need to be taught to transfer or generalise skills.
Learners on these pathways communicate in different ways and often their actions and sounds need to be interpreted by adults in order to develop a more structured form of communication that can be more widely understood. A consistent ‘Total Communication’ approach is essential so that each learner has the opportunity to process and respond. A range of alternative and augmented communication aids are used to allow pupils to communicate choices and to control the world around them. Some of our learners will use body movement, facial expression and vocalisation to communicate and respond. Others will be able to respond through gesture, signing, eye-pointing and simple spoken language. Objects of reference, symbols and on body signing are methods that can be used to develop awareness, anticipation, choice making and understanding. These early learning skills cannot be easily assigned to discrete curriculum areas as many of the skills overlap. The curriculum is personalised for each student based on assessments of individual needs and focus on the following curriculum areas:
· Communication and interaction
· Cognition and learning
· Physical and sensory
· Personal Care and Independence
Individual skills identified in these curriculum pathways are developed continuously, that is during regular individual sessions and generalised in group sessions. Many activities within these pathways provide a breadth of experiences for learners to develop their individual skills. Repetition is key for these learners so they can practise the same skill in a range of contexts and learning environments. Opportunities to experience subject learning such as humanities, science and P.S.H.C.E. are provided through topics of experience with a cross-curricular content.

Impact:

Learners that follow pre-formal and informal pathways will have the opportunity to achieve accreditation at the end of Key Stage 5 through NOCN Personal Progress or Independent Living Skills. Leaners’ skills, knowledge, experiences and understanding are recorded in relation to their level of engagement. For many of our learners on these pathways their destinations will involve moving into a social care setting or attending a specialist post 19 college. For some, supported living may be appropriate with support to access the community. Our role, as educators for these learners is to ensure they have the skills needed to communicate and express their needs and wants to their support workers. This is a fundamental part of their curriculum experience whilst at Regency to enable learners to have the best opportunity to play a full part in the community as they mature into adulthood and leave Regency.

Semi-Formal Pathway
The semi-formal curriculum pathway is for learners who have severe to moderate learning difficulties. These pupils are developing emergent skills and may be able to access aspects of the National Curriculum. All students in the semi-formal pathway are working at below Pre-Key Stage 2 standards.

Intent:

The semi-formal curriculum aims to provide a personalised approach to learning underpinned by EHCP targets that builds on prior learning and the development of communication and independence. Lesson activities in the semi-formal pathway are designed to be motivating and engaging in order that learners will develop confidence to become more independent learners and also be aware of the next steps in their learning journey. Regardless of the physical, emotional and learning challenges faced by the learners due to their special educational needs and disabilities, teaching through the semi-formal curriculum aims to capture the interest and imagination of learners.

Implementation: Learners on this pathway require a high level of adult support, both for their learning needs and their care, and are likely to need some sensory support in addition to a curriculum which is broken down into small steps. Most learners following the semi-formal pathway have additional communication needs, which is effectively supported using Communicate in Print, Clicker, signing, eye-pointing, E-Tran, Eyegaze, simple evolving language, communication with symbols, pictures, objects and PECS.
Semi-formal learning is designed to be creative, engaging and inspiring. Focusing on tangible, hands-on learning which leads to resilient, independent, happy learners with a strong sense of self. The semi-formal curriculum creates opportunities for personalised, pupil-focused learning with meaningful real-world applications.
The curriculum is responsive to the developing needs of learners and is regularly reviewed to ensure they are offered the best opportunities to thrive. The semi-formal curriculum pathway focuses on developing the practical application of skills and knowledge. It centres around the development of student voice and choice, fostering positive social and communication skills.

Impact:

Learners will develop skills to prepare them for adulthood – independence skills, social skills, communication skills. There is a fluidity within this curriculum approach which both allows for and encourages a personalised (or individualised) approach, whilst still recognising that core elements of the curriculum will meet the needs of all learners within the pathway.
The semi-formal pathway allows learners to become confident communicators who effectively self-advocate and shape their own lives by being able to think and problem solve as independently as possible. Beyond school, our learners will gain group or individual voluntary sector work within their local communities. All learners following the semi-formal pathway gain skills to be safe and lead independent lives as far as this is possible.
At KS4 and KS5 learners are provided with the opportunity to access accreditations.

Formal Pathway
The formal pathway is designed for learners with moderate learning difficulties. This pathway is delivered through subject specific teaching. As learners’ transition from KS3 to KS4/5, there is increased focus on working towards suitable, achievable accreditations in specific subject areas.

Intent:

The formal curriculum allows the more able learners at Regency High School to experience a broad range of subject areas and gain relevant qualifications. Subject specific ‘sequences of learning’ support teachers to provide a breath of progressive experiences from KS3 through to KS5, teaching a variety of topics, interests, facts, fictions, and skills. The sequences of learning allow for teachers to be adaptive in their teaching and have the flexibility to offer bespoke timetables, where required, to meet all of our learners needs. The formal curriculum pathway is designed for all teaching and learning to be applied to real life scenarios, preparing each of our formal learners for life beyond school and, importantly, access to level 1 or level 2 accredited courses appropriate to their career progression. The KS3 formal curriculum transitions smoothly into KS4 with all learners experiencing the same subject areas. At KS4 and KS5 learners are provided with the opportunity to access accreditations.

Implementation:

Class groups following the formal curriculum are small with approximately 12 pupils in each class. Classes have one to three teaching assistants with a class teacher leading. This allows for our formal learners to experience small group intervention, adaptive teaching and provides flexibility for learning to be personalised, matching the learners needs at the stage of development ensuring progress is made. Teaching and learning across the formal curriculum encourages learners to think and work independently, on their own or with their peers. Learners produce work that is presented in a work book for each subject allowing for learners to recall and retrieve prior knowledge. Teachers follow a marking policy to provide learners with feedback, feedback provides next step opportunities for learners to reflect on their own learning and challenge their understanding in preparation for further learning to take place. In formal classes students are encouraged to self-assess and peer assess, leading to development of reflection and leadership skills. Using these assessment strategies allows learners to have a breadth of feedback to support them to reflect and consider where their own learning journey progresses to next.
Accreditations are available for students to work towards in KS4. In KS5, learners follow subject areas which link in to suitable Entry level 3 to level 1 accreditations. Pupils on the KS5 formal pathway are provided with the opportunity to attend one or two days at a Further Education facility working towards Entry 3 or Level 1 qualifications, in preparation for accessing FE or employment at the time they choose to leave Regency.

Impact:

The formal curriculum pathway provides learners with a variety of skills in preparation for adulthood, accessing the community safely and finding a suitable career pathway. Learners secure appropriate accreditations to have the opportunity to access further education routes, completing level 1 or level 2 courses or move to supported internship programmes as a stepping stone to employment.

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